My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 195 … Merry Christmas!

christmas treeAs I sit here watching the ducks and geese on the unfrozen lake before me [winter is late arriving this year], I would like to wish you and your family the merriest of Christmases.

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My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 191 … For the record!

tranquilityFor the record, I do not ‘have’ Parkinson’s Disease. The notion that the condition I am experiencing is a disease [named after the English physician who first identified it] is that of a well-intentioned but, I believe, misinformed medical community that inexplicably continues to hold firm to the idea that it is the death of brain cells in the substantia nigra portion of the brain that is the root cause. [why are cells only dying in the substantia nigra?] .

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My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 190 … The importance of exercise!

cheetah runningPeople are now beginning to understand the importance of exercise in restoring health, particularly as it relates to neurological conditions, like parkinson’s. Indeed, exercise benefits us in many ways. Not only does it strengthen muscles and vitalize cardiovascular health, it stimulates and strengthens all of the internal body systems, including the immune system.

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My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 185 … 3 More Things That Mess Me Up!

Gampo_AbbeyAs a follow-up on my most recent post  about calming the mind as well as something I wrote in June about four things that really mess me up, there are three specific situations that seem to exacerbate the symptoms I experience.

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My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 184 … Calming the Mind [Important Information]!

calmnessI had been planning to post a blog about calming the mind for some time, but for various reasons, kept putting it off. Today, the reason for my “procrastination” became very apparent when I received an e-mail with links to two blogs written by Howard Shifke [the American lawyer who fully recovered from parkinson’s] about this very subject.

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My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 175 … Worry!

trustIf you are experiencing a neurological disorder [parkinson’s, ALS, MS] chances are, you’ve spent too much of your life worrying. I certainly have! Worrying about what people think of me. About failing. Worrying about getting beaten up, being laughed at, spanked, criticized, punished, etc. Worrying about money, keeping my job, the mortgage, the kids, my parents, etc. And where did it get me? Absolutely nowhere!

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My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 126 … Movement

fireworksMovement, I believe, is essential for both managing the day today challenges that come from having a neurotransmitter imbalance [particularly one that involves dopamine] and for recovering from the condition [that is to say, healing].

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My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 125 … The Single Most Important Thing for Recovering

happinessThe single most important step in restoring my body’s neurotransmitters to their proper function in order to recover from the symptoms of Parkinson’s is to get my body out of the perpetual fight or flight mode it is in. To do this, means getting my mind [particularly my subconscious mind] out of the chronic state of believing that my life is in danger. And the single most important thing I can do to accomplish this is to put myself in a perpetual state of happiness. This means reprogramming [retraining] my mind and the way I think. I had been developing this theory over the past several months and my recent conversation with Parkinson’s recoverer Bianca Molle coupled with several labyrinth insights cemented my belief. Continue reading

My Journey with Parkinson’s … A Natural Approach: Post 113 … Parkinson’s, let’s call it what it is!

innovationI think it would be extremely helpful if we called Parkinson’s what it really is. It’s not really a disease. At least not in the way we typically think of disease. Rather, it is a neurotransmitter imbalance. It is a malfunction in the body! I think if we called it what it really is, it would take a lot of the fear out of the equation. It would give people hope of recovery [we might believe that a disease can’t be cured, but certainly we can believe that a neurotransmitter imbalance can be fixed]. And it might just change the direction we take as it relates to treatment and research.

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