Self Esteem and Performance

How we feel about ourselves is an extremely important aspect of human experience. One could argue that on a day to day basis, nothing is more vital to our quality of life. When we feel lovable, deserving, good enough and empowered, things generally go pretty well and when we are tested with adversity, which we surely will be, we are better able to handle it emotionally.

All too often, however, our self esteem is derived from what we do and how well we perform. This is particularly true in professional sports and entertainment. We do something special, so we think we are special. We put enormous pressure on ourselves to maintain our performance levels and quite often our self esteem slips when our performance doesn’t measure up.

This mindset is at the root of the celebrity worship phenomenon. You’re rich and famous so you must be better than me. We personalize it and it’s evident in the language we use…”Wow, you’re awesome,” or “Wow, you’re an amazing hockey player,” rather than, “Wow, you play hockey really well.”

It’s okay to admire people for their skills and accomplishments, but that’s as far as it need go.

The truth is, healthy self esteem has little to do with what we do or how well we do it. The development of a positive self image begins early in childhood when we receive unconditional love and acceptance. When we are raised in a way that we feel safe. When we learn the essence of trust, self respect and confidence. It also comes from knowing the truth of who we are…spiritual aspects of God, living in oneness with all that is.

When it comes to performance, what is most important is that we have all the basic fundamentals including a healthy self image to want to give it our best.  Self esteem comes not from the results of our performance, rather it is fostered when we perform with honour, participate with good sportsmanship, treat people well and know that we’ve done our best.

“Wow, I like the way you did that!”

Have an awesome day!

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